Interim Final Rule on Homebound

In Blog, ICD-10, News by Lisa Selman-Holman1 Comment

Interim Final Rule on Homebound CMS-1744-IFC

Per sections 1814(a) and 1835(a) of the Act, an individual shall be considered to be “confined to his home” if the individual has a condition, due to an illness or injury, that restricts the ability of the individual to leave his or her home except with the assistance of another individual or the aid of a supportive device (such as crutches, a cane, a wheelchair, or a walker), or if the individual has a condition such that leaving his or her home is medically contraindicated. While an individual does not have to be bedridden to be considered “confined to his home”, the condition of the individual should be such that there exists a normal inability to leave home and, that leaving home requires a considerable and taxing effort by the individual.

What does “Medically Contraindicated” mean in this context?

The definition of “confined to the home” (that is, “homebound”) allows patients to be considered “homebound” if it is medically contraindicated for the patient to leave the home. As an example for the PHE for COVID-19 pandemic, this would apply for those patients: (1) where a physician has determined that it is medically contraindicated for a beneficiary to leave the home because he or she has a confirmed or suspected diagnosis of COVID-19; or (2) where a physician has determined that it is medically contraindicated for a beneficiary to leave the home because the patient has a condition that may make the patient more susceptible to contracting COVID-19. A patient who is exercising “self-quarantine” for one’s own safety would not be considered “confined to the home” unless a physician certifies that it is medically contraindicated for the patient to leave the home.

For the PHE for the COVID-19 pandemic, the CDC is currently advising that older adults and individuals with serious underlying health conditions stay home (CDC’s guidance is interim and is expected to continue to be updated as warranted). As such, we expect that many Medicare beneficiaries could be considered “confined to the home”. However, determinations of whether home health services are reasonable and necessary, including whether the patient is homebound and needs skilled services, must be based on an assessment of each beneficiary’s individual condition and care needs. In cases where it is medically contraindicated for the patient to leave the home, the medical record documentation for the patient must include information as to why the individual condition of the patient is such that leaving the home is medically contraindicated.

With regard to a pandemic outbreak of an infectious disease, this can include reviewing and applying any guidance on risk assessment and public health management issued by the CDC. For example, the CDC interim guidance “Preventing the Spread of Coronavirus Disease 2019 in Homes and Residential Communities” applies for both confirmed or suspected COVID-19 states that patients who are medically stable enough to receive care in the home must isolate at home during their illness.  Additionally, these guidelines state that patients should restrict activities outside the home, except for getting medical care. These restrictions include that the individual does not go to work, school, or public areas, as well as avoiding the use of public transportation, ride-sharing, or taxis, making it such that there exists a normal inability for an individual to leave home and leaving home would require a considerable and taxing effort.

Medically Contraindicated to Leave Home Examples

In regard to those circumstances in which the patient does not have confirmed or suspected diagnosis of an infectious disease, such as COVID-19, but the patient’s physician states that it is medically contraindicated for the patient to leave the home because the patient’s condition may make the patient more susceptible to contracting a pandemic disease, the patient would be considered “confined to the home” or “homebound” for purposes of this eligibility requirement.

For example, if a patient is having an exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and the physician certifies that it is medically contraindicated to leave the home because the patient’s compromised respiratory system makes him or her more likely to contract an infectious disease, such as COVID-19, the patient would be considered “confined to the home” in alignment with Medicare home health eligibility criteria.

Another example of this type of scenario would be a cancer patient receiving chemotherapy treatment and where the physician states that it is medically contraindicated for the patient to leave the home because the patient may be more at risk of contracting an infectious disease because of the patient’s immunocompromised state. In both examples, the medical contraindication makes it such that there exists a normal inability for an individual to leave home and leaving home safely would require a considerable and taxing effort.

Obtaining Culture by Itself is NOT Skilled Care

Even if the patient is confined to the home because of a suspected diagnosis of an infectious disease as part of a pandemic event, a home health visit solely to obtain a nasal or throat culture would not be considered a skilled service because it would not require the skills of a nurse to obtain the culture as the specimen could be obtained by an appropriately-trained medical assistant or laboratory technician. However, a home health nurse, during an otherwise covered skilled visit, could obtain the nasal or throat culture to send to the laboratory for testing.



Lisa Selman-Holman, JD, BSN, RN
President, Selman-Holman, A Briggs Healthcare Company

Comments

  1. – appreciate much …. very informative and will help our agency a lot ….

Leave a Comment